Plato the republic book 1

Justice is Better than Injustice. Rejection of Mimetic Art X.

Plato the republic book 1

Nor can the good harm any one?

Plato the republic book 1

And the just is the good? Then to injure a friend or any one else is not the act of a just man, but of the opposite, who is the unjust? I think that what you say is quite true, Socrates.

Plato the republic book 1

Then if a man says that justice consists in the repayment of debts, and that good is the debt which a man owes to his friends, and evil the debt which he owes to his enemies, --to say this is not wise; for it is not true, if, as has been clearly shown, the injuring of another can be in no case just.

I agree with you, said Polemarchus. Then you and I are prepared to take up arms against any one who attributes such a saying to Simonides or Bias or Pittacus, or any other wise man or seer? I am quite ready to do battle at your side, he said. Shall I tell you whose I believe the saying to be?

Yes, I said; but if this definition of justice also breaks down, what other can be offered?

The Internet Classics Archive | The Republic by Plato

Several times in the course of the discussion Thrasymachus had made an attempt to get the argument into his own hands, and had been put down by the rest of the company, who wanted to hear the end.

But when Polemarchus and I had done speaking and there was a pause, he could no longer hold his peace; and, gathering himself up, he came at us like a wild beast, seeking to devour us. We were quite panic-stricken at the sight of him. Socrates, has taken possession of you all? And why, sillybillies, do you knock under to one another?

I say that if you want really to know what justice is, you should not only ask but answer, and you should not seek honour to yourself from the refutation of an opponent, but have your own answer; for there is many a one who can ask and cannot answer.

And now I will not have you say that justice is duty or advantage or profit or gain or interest, for this sort of nonsense will not do for me; I must have clearness and accuracy.

I was panic-stricken at his words, and could not look at him without trembling. Indeed I believe that if I had not fixed my eye upon him, I should have been struck dumb: Polemarchus and I may have been guilty of a little mistake in the argument, but I can assure you that the error was not intentional.

And why, when we are seeking for justice, a thing more precious than many pieces of gold, do you say that we are weakly yielding to one another and not doing our utmost to get at the truth?

Nay, my good friend, we are most willing and anxious to do so, but the fact is that we cannot. And if so, you people who know all things should pity us and not be angry with us.

Plato: The Republic | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

How characteristic of Socrates! Did I not foresee --have I not already told you, that whatever he was asked he would refuse to answer, and try irony or any other shuffle, in order that he might avoid answering?

If one of these numbers which you interdict be the true answer to the question, am I falsely to say some other number which is not the right one? Just as if the two cases were at all alike!

Why should they not be?The Republic By Plato Book I: Socrates - GLAUCON I went down yesterday to the Piraeus with Glaucon the son of Ariston, that I might offer up my prayers to the goddess; and also because I wanted to see in what manner they would celebrate the festival, which was a new thing.

Free summary and analysis of Book I in Plato's The Republic that won't make you snore. We promise. The Republic of Plato is also the first treatise upon education, of which the wri- tings of Milton and Locke, Rousseau, Jean Paul, and Goethe are the legitimate descendants.

During Plato's time, Greek thinkers had already established the idea that the good man possesses four cardinal virtues: courage, temperance, justice, and wisdom.

Plato: The Republic Since the mid-nineteenth century, the Republic has been Plato’s most famous and widely read dialogue. As in most other Platonic dialogues the main character is Socrates. During Plato's time, Greek thinkers had already established the idea that the good man possesses four cardinal virtues: courage, temperance, justice, and wisdom.

SparkNotes: The Republic: Book I